Shoot for the moon, even if you miss you'll land among the stars!

Christmas Needs & Wants / The Grinch

This week we’ve been learning about holiday traditions and the differences between needs and wants during the holidays.  We started off by reading How the Grinch Stole Christmas and discussed how the Grinch learned that Christmas wasn’t about presents.  We made construction paper Grinchs and wrote how we would make the Grinch grin.

For social studies the next day, we watched a video on Brain Pop Jr about what a need is, what a want is, and their differences.  We sorted pictures into the two categories.  For art we made stockings, cut out pictures from magazines, and sorted them into needs and wants on the stockings.  You can get a Christmas Needs vs Wants freebie activity here.

 

Olive the Other Reindeer

As we continued to learn about caribou we also read other fiction stories including Olive The Other Reindeer.  We filled out a bubble map that illustrated four ideas of our favorite parts of the story.  Then students chose one part of the story that they liked the best and wrote about it.  You can get the writing activity here.

  

One student wrote “she was riding on his sleigh”, and another student wrote “My favorite part of the story was when she got on the bus.”

At the end of our unit students partner read a Rudolph emergent reader that talked about things that Rudolph saw.  Students colored the pictures based on the color words that were in the books.  They also made reindeer headbands.  Headbands can be found here and emergent reader books can be found here.

    

Rudolph vs. Caribou

Last week was our reindeer theme!  We started by reading Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer, and Rudolph’s Bright Christmas.  We also read a nonfiction story about caribou.  As a class we labeled a Venn diagram that showed the similarities and differences between Rudolph and caribou.  We also made cut and paste Rudolph’s.

    

Escape of the Gingerbread Men!

On Friday to finish up our gingerbread unit we baked gingerbread men.  When students came back they had ran away and the class had to find them.  Once they found their gingerbread men they decorated them and ate them.

Compare & Contrast Gingerbread Stories

The whole week we read several different gingerbread stories and we discussed differences and similarities in the stories.  We read Gingerbread Man and Gingerbread Boy and filled out a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast the different characters of the stories.

 

On Thursday we read Gingerbread Baby and discussed how the ending is different where the Gingerbread Baby doesn’t get eaten but has a house built for him by Matti.  Then we created houses for our own gingerbread babies.  You can buy an updated version of this activity here.

  

 

I Would Run From…

This week we read many different gingerbread stories (Gingerbread Man, Boy, Baby, Bear, etc).  The first story we read was the classic version Gingerbread Man.  We retold the story using character cards and then did a cut and paste activity that showed the correct sequence of the story.

Then we brainstormed things that are scary to us and filled out a web thinking map answering things that we would run from.  We then took our brainstorming, picked one thing that was the scariest and wrote about them.

 

The next day we looked at different ways to write the story of The Gingerbread Man.  We made a list of different action verbs and then made gingerbread men with a mini verb booklet.

More Thanksgiving Last Update

Just to catch everyone up on our Thanksgiving unit last week:

We used the Scholastic First Thanksgiving Virtual Field trip to learn about the Wompanoag Native American tribe that made friends with the Pilgrims and helped them survive the winter. We compared the Pilgrims Daily life to the Wompanoags Daily Life. The comparisons included food, houses, clothing, chores, and games.  We also created pilgrim hats and turned them into headbands that we wore out to the buses.

During math we’ve been learning about shapes and how to design patterns.  We created a native american head and shirt. Then we used real pattern block to practice making our own design for the shirts. Then we used paper pattern blocks that we glued to decorate the Wompanoag’s shirt. Last we counted how many of each pattern block we used and wrote it on the recording sheet.  You can find a FREE COPY of this activity here.

 


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